Posts Currently viewing the tag: "MODIS"

Though the Sea of Okhotsk off the eastern coast of Russia is almost entirely covered in ice during the winter months, it is one of the more productive marine environments in the world during the late spring and summer months. Though the island is now officially part of Russia, it has switched hands several times…(Read More)

Over the past two and a half years, several large icebergs have separated from the Ross Ice Shelf in Antarctica and some have made their way out into the Pacific Ocean to melt. Mainland Antarctica lies across the left side of the image. The Ross Ice Shelf is the solid, uniform white mass on the…(Read More)

This pair of false-color images (top) from the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER), flying aboard NASA’s Terra satellite, shows mountain Kazbek in Southern Russia before and after the collapse of the Kolka Glacier in 2002. On September 20, a collapse of a hanging glacier from the slope of mountain Dzhimarai…(Read More)

Snowfall returned to the mountain ranges of western and central Colorado on September 18—the first significant accumulation of the 2002-03 snow season. Most of Colorado experienced drought conditions throughout the summer, so this precipitation was badly needed. In this true-color scene, acquired on Sept. 20 by the Terra MODIS sensor, the bright…(Read More)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS), flying aboard NASA’s Terra and Aqua satellites, measures snow cover over the entire globe every day, cloud cover permitting. At spatial resolutions of up to 500 meters per pixel, MODIS allows scientists to distinguish between snow and clouds, both of which appear bright white when seen from above…(Read More)

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